AAA Urges Motorists to Be Alert When Schools Are Open

BURNSVILLE, Mn (August 17, 2017) – As more than 55 million students across the United States get ready to start the 2017-18 school year, AAA urges motorists to slow down and stay alert in neighborhoods and school zones.  With new schedules starting once again for many families, it’s critical to be aware of increased child pedestrian activity before -and after-school hours. The afternoon hours are particularly dangerous for children who are walking.  Over the last decade, nearly one-third of child pedestrian fatalities occurred between 3 and 7 p.m.

AAA’s School’s Open – Drive Carefully awareness campaign was launched in 1946 to help reduce the number of school-related pedestrian injuries and fatalities.  In 2015, more than 343 child pedestrians died and 11,000 were injured nationwide.

 "AAA’s School’s Open – Drive Carefully awareness campaign is designed to curb a trend of unsafe driving behavior as children head back to school," said Amy Stracke, Managing Director, Traffic Safety Advocacy for AAA – The Auto Club Group and Executive Director of the Auto Club Group Traffic Safety Foundation.   “It’s important for motorists to fully focus on driving and remember to be on the lookout for children walking or riding their bicycles to and from school.”

Here are several recommendations from AAA regarding ways drivers can help to keep children safe:

About Auto Club Group Traffic Safety Foundation
Established by AAA – The Auto Club Group in 2010, Auto Club Group Traffic Safety Foundation, Inc. (ACGTSF) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization and public charity dedicated to producing a significant and continuous reduction in traffic crashes, injuries and deaths in the communities targeted by its efforts. ACGTSF provides programs, education and outreach to increase public awareness about the importance of traffic safety and improve driving behavior. ACGTSF is funded by voluntary, tax-deductible contributions from organizations and individuals who support ACGTSF’s purpose.